Early morning, September 2013

Early morning, September 2013

Even if you just keep a few horses in your backyard, you are still a farmer, and you have to keep up with what your neighbors are doing. Because the corn was pretty ripe and dry, I knew the farmer who leases the adjacent fields to my back paddocks would soon be taking it off. That means his big combine would be chewing up cornstalks and spitting them out the back, with the attendant noise, and dust that monster field master brings. Of course even the broke horses are somewhat terrified so I moved them out of those paddocks last week when the stalks began to look quite yellow. I knew he would be combining them soon. Yesterday afternoon, and late into the night, after 9:00 p.m., they worked in the field. They hopefully left me a few straggling stalks to glean for jump decorations around the edges. Rugby was not happy. His paddock is the only adjacent to the cornfield and he was pretty edgy last night when I walked  him out of the barn at 8 pm for turnout. Nope. We went back in the barn and I put him out at 11 pm after the Field Monster had been turned off for the night. The good news is Rugby is 60 to 80 percent better. He is definitely not as lame and bearing weight. Brian took a good look at the foot and we found a bit of a rotten spot near the heel, and we are now thinking it’s an abcess up in the back portion of the foot, that the shoe and wedge heel pad was aggravating. I am duly poulticing, wrapping, and soaking, well as much as this 16-year-old pain-in-the-neck will tolerate. He’s never been fond of soaking and foot tubs. While he is still tender and sore he’s not as lame so whatever was wrong is not AS wrong after two days of care. Hmmm. Still not really sure what is going on.

I baked an apple pie this morning, have banana bread and brownies yet to go. Horses to ride. Have to finish some landscaping in front of the house and weeding. Clean up the barn. Get things ready for a quick getaway tomorrow morning. I have to leave about 2 hours before that 7:30 a.m. meeting up at Plantation. This gives enough time to stop for breakfast, coffee, and to use the facilities on the way up. At home, I will have to have all the breakfast grains ready, the horses will need to come in quickly, eat, and be kicked back out as soon as the last mouthful is being chewed. Tonight I will water up late so there will be enough for tomorrow. They will need fly masks and fly spray in the dark before I leave. It has to go quickly, every step has to be planned out, as there will not be much time – each extra minute cuts into travel time and makes it hard to not to have to hurry. Hopefully I won’t get too much fly spray on me to smell all day long like a gas station. Also the car will need to be packed tonight as well with dry socks and shoes for the warm part of the day (I will start out in the morning with dew-proof boots) as well as layers, sunscreen, a couple of hats, cutter spray for insects and a few other personal things. In the morning, the charged-up cameras, phones, cold pack of water and drinks, a sandwich, fruit, and snacks will go with me if I remember it all. I will get gas tonight so I need only make one stop in the morning, probably at Wawa on Rt. 7, about halfway. All of this — just to sit in a car and watch horses go by for eight hours. Crazy? Very much so. I just hope this time around no one yells at me or dumps garbage in my car!

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